Harvest Monday: Picking up steam

We grow 'em big and tender at Henbogle

No photos this week of the harvest as I needed to recharge my camera batteries.  Instead here’s a pic of some of the hen’s supplemental food I’m growing. Mmmmm.

After a cool spring, the garden is picking up steam.  The lettuce and spinach is abundant, and the first of the early brassicas have been harvested and eaten.  Other veggies are really starting to grow.  We had rain over the weekend and plants really increased in size, especially my lettuce in the main garden, which is good as much of this week’s harvest was pulled from the hoophouse to make room for heat loving crops.

The harvest included 3 oz. chive for chive blossom vinegar, 17 oz. of red sails lettuce, 15 oz. spinach, and the first broccoli of the season weighing in at 4 delicious ounces.  Not a big harvest, but a delicious one!  This week’s harvest totaled 2.44 lbs.bringing the 2011 total to 20.73 lbs. valued at $84.24.  But uh oh, I bought some more lettuce seedlings at the Farmer’s Market, as mine haven’t germinated so well in the soil blocks.  That added $7.50 to my expenses, and brings the yearly value of the harvest to $-297.82 when taking my expenses of $383.06 into consideration. Man, things are slow to even out this year!

This post is part of Daphne’s Harvest Monday series on her blog, Daphne’s Dandelions.  Click on over to see what other gardeners are harvesting this week.

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13 Responses to “Harvest Monday: Picking up steam”

  1. Allison @ Novice Life Says:

    Is that a slug? LOL

    Yum…broccoli!

  2. kitsapFG Says:

    We have an abundant crop of slugs too. My hens only like them when they are small though and tend to avoid the monster big ones.

    • Ali Says:

      The hens are so funny about slugs. I toss them to the hens, who race to grab it. One hen will win, and will race around, all the others following, even though she clearly doesn’t want to eat it. They just make me laugh….

  3. nartaya Says:

    Ewww, I just figured out what tha was… gross. But good hen eating! Your hens would have had a field day here during clean-up time yesterday. I found about 10-15 slugs. I had to be really quiet about moving them or my oldest would have started playing with them. I thought that his snail friend as enough for one day….

  4. Daphne Says:

    Gack! I hate those enormous orange slugs. I wish I had chickens to feed them to. But here we also get snails. They are so pretty I almost hate the kill them. But I do.

  5. meemsnyc Says:

    I had to click on the image to see that it was a slug. Ick!! LOL. Thank goodness that I’ve only found small slugs in my garden.

  6. Jennifer Fisk Says:

    If only we could come up with a good use for slugs. This year they could represent a pretty income producing crop for cash strapped Mainers.
    I go out with headlamp armed with squirt bottle of ammonia and water. Kind of fun in a morbid sort of way.

    • Ali Says:

      Jennifer, I love the income-crop idea… but what to use them for, glue?

      • Jennifer Fisk Says:

        Chicken food? If only they had oil to extract for fuel but alas, we are stuck with them in our gardens with no earthly use.

  7. Mike R Says:

    I don’t have slugs at my place, not yet anyway, but enjoy tossing the tomato hornworms into the pond for the fish. If I do get slugs they’ll be fish food. Good to see things are picking up. Where do you find prices for all your produce?

  8. Ali Says:

    Mike,
    You can read more about how I decide the pricing on an earlier post here: https://henbogle.wordpress.com/vegetable-garden-costbenefit-analysis/

    I check the local farmer’s markets, and the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners produce a monthly organic price report which compares prices from organic farms across the state. The USDA does something similar, but it was pretty unwieldy to use when I was not growing by the bushel.

  9. Thomas Says:

    LOL. Your caption made me laugh. When I first started garden, the sight of the bigs ones would make me squeamish but now, I just cut them in half with my garden scissors. Sounds sadistic doesn’t it?

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